Blog   |   E-Newsletter   |   Donate
EPFP Alumni Blog
Blog Home All Blogs
Welcome to the EPFP Alumni Blog! Here we highlight the work of EPFP alumni around the country by featuring guest blog posts about our three pillars: Policy, Leadership, and Networking. For more information or to report abuse of this feature, please contact the EPFP national program staff at epfp@iel.org.

Submit a post to the alumni blog.

 

Search all posts for:   

 

Top tags: alumni  leadership  civil rights  cross-boundary leader  equity  policy  career  community college  data  disability  education  justice  networking  parents  research  SEL  unity  virginia  washington dc  WIE 

Cross-Boundary Leader: Maurice Sykes

Posted By Jennifer Masutani, Monday, November 24, 2014
Cross-Boundary Leader: Maurice Sykes

(EPFP '78-79)

 

Maurice Sykes is an Education Policy Fellowship (EPFP ’78-79) Alum and Director of the Early Childhood Leadership Institute at the University of the District of Columbia. His book, Doing the Right Thing for Children: Eight Qualities of Leadership, was recently published by Redleaf Press. In his book, he shares stories of his leadership journey sprinkled with personal anecdotes that reflect the challenges and opportunities that he has experienced throughout his professional career. He has organized the book around his prescription for leadership success based on his eight core leadership values: Human Potential, Knowledge, Social Justice, Competence, Fun and Enjoyment, Personal Renewal, Perseverance, and Courage. We asked him about his leadership lessons.

Cross-boundary leadership

Being a well-developed Myers-Briggs extrovert, quite naturally I draw my energy and inspiration from the external world.  I have always possessed a collaborative spirit and I have always believed that the business of education is everybody's business.  Therefore, I operate in multiple spheres of influence within and outside of the educational arena.

 

I view myself as an urban educator whose specialty is early childhood education.  However, my book is aimed at developing cross-boundary, early childhood leaders who view their work as a building block for school readiness, K-12 school reform, workforce development/college readiness and the overall improvement of community economic development.  While situated in the early childhood space, my book is about enrolling the right people and fostering collaboration across organizational boundaries to promote social justice and equality of opportunity for children from under-resourced communities. It is intended to create a compelling context for doing the right thing for children.

Challenge

Some things just come with the territory and challenges and opportunities are a part of the leadership experience.  Some of the challenges are from external forces, some are from internal forces and some of the challenges are self-generated.  In all three instances, the leader must first assess where the challenges and opportunities are coming from and what are the most appropriate set of remedies/responses to "fix" the situation.  The least productive response is to seek to find the "culprit" by blaming everyone except yourself. It has been my experience that when challenges arise it is time to bring vision, voice and visibility to the situation.  This is where you apply your knowledge of you your craft, knowledge of yourself and knowledge of others to the situation.  It is the interaction and the interdependence of these threes spheres of knowledge that enables leaders to overcome challenges and exploit opportunities.


“EPFP was the most powerful professional development I had in my career, in large part due to a meticulous way EPFP created a set of developmental experiences that took people out of their comfort zone and exposed them to different perspectives. EPFP was transformational for me due to people we interacted with. We were taught networking as a science, how to cast and refurbish the net; how to understand networking and self on a deeper level. We had a broad range of opportunities and developmental experiences and interacted with cutting edge thinkers. EPFP was enlightening and transformative.”

 

Lessons Learned

The biggest lesson that I have learned is that sometimes you have to slow down in order to speed up change that is enduring and transformational.  There are two core leadership lessons that emerge from my book:

First, leaders need to be in constant conversation with themselves and their practice. What gets in the way is our biggest blind spot – absence of self-knowledge. Leaders must challenge their own thinking. A strong leader knows him or her self and has the interpersonal power to enter a room and engage in a dialogue with others in a strategic, authentic and purposeful manner.

Second, courageous acts are not always great, but they are courageous nonetheless. For example, it takes courage to confront one's self and others in order to continuously advocate for children.  The quality of a great leader should be measured as much by his or her detractors as it is measured by his or her supporters. I am always somewhat skeptical about leaders who everyone likes. People might not always like your decisions, but if you are guided by your core values you will always do what is in the best interest of children. 

 

Tags:  alumni  leadership  washington dc 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 
Contact Us at 4301 Connecticut Ave, NW, Suite 100 | Washington, DC 20008 | 202-822-8405 | epfp@iel.org

Membership Management Software Powered by YourMembership  ::  Legal